Rhipicephalus bursa

Also known as the Brown ear tick

Hosts

All mammals: cattle, sheep, horse, dog, human

Distribution

Mediterranean regions

Switzerland

Bulgaria

Romania

Rhipicephalus bursa is generally found in areas ranging in latitude from low to medium.  They can also range in environment from mountainous slopes to semi- desert, but are generally found in grassy areas.

Pathogenesis

Cattle: Babesia bigemina, Babesia bovis, Anaplasma marginale

Horse: Babesia caballi, Babesia equi

Sheep: Babesia motasi, Babesia ovis, Theileria separata, Anaplasma ovis, Ehrlichia ovina

 

Other diseases that have been associated with R. bursa  include:

Tick paralysis

Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus

Description

Adult female dorsal features

  • Basis capituli lateral angles are sharp
  • Porose areas are oval and close together
  • Palps are short
  • Scapular groove is shallow
  • Interstitial punctations are medium- large and dense
  • Scutum is dark
  • Unfed females can measure between 4.2mm-4.5mm in length
  • Engorged females can measure up to 10mm

Adult female dorsal view and adult female close up of gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

Adult female ventral features

  • Coxae I: large, distinct, equally paired internal and external spurs
  • Coxae II-IV: indistinct external spurs

Adult female ventral view and adult female close up of coxae/ventral gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

Adult male dorsal features

  • Coxae I: anterior spurs are visible dorsally
  • Cervical field depressions are not apparent
  • Posterior grooves are indistinct
  • Lateral grooves are distinct
  • Males measure between 3.8mm-4.3mm in length

Adult male dorsal view and adult male close up of gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

Adult male ventral features

  • Coxae I: large, distinct, equally paired internal and external spurs
  • Coxae II-IV: indistinct external spurs
  • Accessory adanal shield present but small
  • Adanal shields are broad and curved

Adult male ventral view and adult male close up of coxae/ventral gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

 

 

 

 

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