Ixodes canisuga

Also known as the Dog tick

Hosts

Dog, fox, Badger, sheep, horse, cats

Distribution

Widespread throughout Europe and as far East as Russia

UK

Ireland

Ixodes canisuga have a relatively thick cuticle, resulting in an ability to withstand dry conditions.  For this reason it is often found in kennels

Pathogenesis

Dogs: large infestation may cause dermatitis pruritus, alopecia and anaemia

 

Other diseases associated with Ixodes canisuga include:

Babesia missiroli (badgers)

Pasteurella pestis (in Russia)

Description

Adult female dorsal features

  • Cornua absent
  • Tarsus I is humped when viewed in profile
  • Length of unfed female ranges between 2.8mm-3.2mm
  • Length of engorged female can be up to 8.0mm

Adult female dorsal view and adult female close up of gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

Adult female ventral features

  • Coxae I-IV: lack internal and external spurs
  • Auriculae present but indistinct

Adult female ventral view and adult female close up of coxae/ventral gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

Adult male dorsal features

  • Palps short and blunt
  • Overall length unfed 2.0mm-2.2mm

Adult male dorsal view and adult male close up of gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

Adult male ventral features

  • Coxae I: short internal spur
  • Coxae II-IV: internal and external spurs absent
  • Median plate has a narrow anterior boarder and broad posterior
  • Both adanal and epimeral plates present and almost as large as median plate

Adult male ventral view and adult male close up of coxae/ventral gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

 

 

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