Hyalomma marginatum

Also known as the Bont-legged tick

Hosts

Cattle, horses, dogs, human

Distribution

Britain (Larvae and nymphs only from migratory birds)

France

Denmark

Norway

Portugal

Pathogenesis

Dogs: Babesia canis

Cattle: Babesia ovis, Rickettsia aeschlimanii and Crimea-Congo haemorrhagic fever

Horse: Babesia caballi and Theileria equi

 

Hyalomma marginatum is also known to be a vector of;

Babesia equi

Nutallia equi

Brucella abortus

Crimean haemorrhagic fever in humans

Description

Adult female dorsal features

  • Scapular grooves steep
  • Legs with pale rings
  • Punctations are small and sparse
  • Porose areas large
  • Unfed female can measure 5.0mm-6.5mm in length
  • Engorged females can measure up to¬† in length 20mm in length

Adult female dorsal view and adult female close up of gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

Adult female ventral features

  • Coxae I: long and distinct internal and external spur, that are large and equal
  • Coxae II-IV: indistinct external spurs that can be hard to see

Adult female ventral view and adult female close up of coxae/ventral gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

Adult male dorsal features

  • Cervical field depression is apparent
  • Lateral grooves are long
  • Scapular grooves present
  • Caudal depression is present
  • Central festoon is dark in colour
  • Paramedian grooves are small and indistinct
  • Males can measure between 3.8mm-4.5mm

Adult male dorsal view and adult male close up of gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

Adult male ventral features

  • Coxae I: long and distinct internal and external spur, that are large and equal
  • Coxae II-IV: indistinct external spurs that can be hard to see
  • Adanal shields present; square ended
  • Sub-anal plates present; distinct and aligned with adanal shield

Adult male ventral view and adult male close up of coxae/ventral gnathosoma. (Click on pictures for a close up)

 

 

 

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